THE ARTS

AN EASY HOLIDAY RECIPES: EASY NO BAKE PUMPKIN PIE

GRADES: K-8

This is a great idea to use during the fall theme, pumpkin theme, Thanksgiving, Christmas, etc. It is a good idea to make up a batch ahead of time and let the kids mix up a batch in class. Then they can assemble their own pies. One recipe makes enough for 20-25 kids depending on the size of the scoop.

MATERIALS:

  • 1 large package of vanilla instant pudding
  • 1 small can of pumpkin
  • 2 1/2 cups of milk
  • 2 teaspoons of pumpkin pie spice.
  • 1 package of graham crackers or Nilla wafers
  • 1 container of Cool Whip (canned whip cream can also be used.)

METHOD:

  1. Mix the first four ingredients together in a bowl. Put in refrigerator for 2 hours.
  2. Place 1/4 of a graham cracker or 1 Nilla wafer in the bottom of a small cup.
  3. Add one small scoop of pumpkin mixture.
  4. Top with cool whip. Enjoy!

Submitted by,

LISA GUTTRIDGE
CHARLES MACK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
SACRAMENTO, CA
ragleg4@prodigy.net

GIANT SCARECROWS

GRADES: K-5

MATERIALS:

  • 1 child-sized long sleeve shirt for each student
  • 1 child-sized pair of long pants for each student
  • 1 solid colored pillowcase for each student
  • newspaper
  • string
  • markers/paint/yarn/buttons, etc. for making/decorating the face and head
  • scissors
  • wooden dowels

METHOD:

  1. The week before we make scarecrows, I send a letter to the parents explaining the project. I ask each parent to send in one child sized long sleeve shirt, one child sized pair of long pants, one solid colored pillowcase, and one newspaper (each item clearly labeled with the child's name.) I explain that the clothes will not be returned in their original condition. I have them check off if they can't provide a certain item and tell them that it will be provided for their child. I also tend to get parents who send in extras for other children. I've built up a large collection over the last 10 years!
  2. In another letter, I ask for parents to come in and volunteer to help us sew the scarecrows together. I give them a choice of 2 days and times. For this project, I never say no to a parent. The more volunteers you get, the quicker the project goes.
  3. Day 1) Legs (no parents needed) - I use string to tie the bottoms of the legs of the pants. The children crumple pieces of newspaper into balls and stuff the pants. When finished, it looks like a full pair of pants. I line them up on the windowsill. They stand quite easily.
  4. Day 2) Shirts (parents needed)- I use string to tie the end of each sleeve and the bottom of the shirt. The children crumple pieces of newspaper into balls and stuff the shirt making sure to get inside the sleeves. The children bring their stuffed shirt and pants over to a parent and the parent sews them together. ***Remind the parents to sew the front of the shirt to the front of the pants!
  5. Day 3) Head (parents needed) - I cut the pillowcase in half. Two children can really use one pillowcase. The children spread the pillowcase onto the floor and place pieces of crumpled newspaper into the center. I ask them to decide how big they want the head to be. When they are ready, I wrap the pillowcase around the newspaper balls and tie it at the bottom. The children bring their sewn shirt and pants over to a parent and the parent sews the head to the body.
  6. Day 4) Decorating (no parents needed)- The children use any materials that they would like to decorate their scarecrows. They paint the face, use buttons for the eyes, pom-poms, yarn for hair, felt scraps for decorations, etc. It is totally up to the child to decide how to decorate his/her scarecrow. Many children sit the scarecrow in a chair (like the beauty parlor) and decorate.
  7. Day 5) Sticks (no parents needed)- I have wooden dowels, 3 feet long. The child lays the scarecrow on its "belly." I use a scissor to cut a hole through the pants, shirt, and neck. The child pushes a wooden dowel through the holes. I use a hammer and one thumbtack to attach the scarecrow to the dowel (the thumbtack usually goes through the top of the shirt and into the top of the dowel.)
  8. Well, that's pretty much it. The most important things to remember are to be PREPARED and FLEXIBLE. Some children decide not to put their scarecrows on sticks. Others do the whole thing in one day. They see how it looks and then begin. Some volunteers who come to sew heads might be helping with shirts and pants.
  9. I should also mention that all of the string tying and pillowcase cutting is done before the children come to school. I put their pants, shirts, or pillowcases (depending on the day) in their cubbies, ready to be stuffed.
  10. One more suggestion... Take lots of pictures. We put together a scarecrow book which describes the sequence and, of course, shows each child with his/her individual scarecrow.

submitted by

GAIL HARITON
HEIGHTS SCHOOL
ROSLYN HTS., NY
hariton@li.net



STUFFED/RECYCLED PAPER PUMPKINS

GRADES: K-3

MATERIALS:

  • 18x24 white newsprint
  • orange tempera paint and containers
  • largish brushes
  • scissors
  • glue
  • stapler
  • orange markers or crayons
  • scraps of construction paper

METHOD:

  1. After discussion or an appropriate poem or short book about pumpkins, hand out the markers and newsprint. (It is very helpful to write the children's names in permanent marker on front and back of paper ahead of time, to eliminate later confusion.)
  2. The children are instructed to draw a great/huge pumpkin upon their paper with marker.
  3. Have each child paint the pumpkins. Set them out to dry.
  4. You, the teacher, must glue each pumpkin to another piece of newsprint, leaving an opening at the bottom, large enough for a hand to fit through.
  5. Next class, have students cut out the pumpkins, reminding them to cut through both sheets of paper at one time. Do not throw away scraps.
  6. Decorate the pumpkins with faces cut from construction paper scraps. Scrunch the scrap paper into balls and stuff the pumpkins.
  7. The teacher must staple the bottom closed. These can be hung from the ceiling, or placed into a pumpkin patch bulletin board.
 

submitted by

LINDA MOUCHA
BARRY COMMUNITY SCHOOLS
BARRY, IL
lmoucha@roe1.k12.il.us


GHOSTS

GRADES: K-5

MATERIALS:

  • roll of wax paper
  • black construction paper
  • an iron
  • ironing board
  • scissors

METHOD:

  1. Take a large sheet of the wax paper and then fold it in half.
  2. Cut out a figure of a ghost. When you're done with this there will be two ghost
  3. With the black construction, cut out a mouth and two eyes
  4. Slide these in between the sheets of waxed paper
  5. Place the ghost on the ironing board and put newspaper over and iron away. You won't need to iron to long to have it set.
  6. You can have your ghost hanging from the ceiling or on the windows. Each will be just as different as the child who makes it.
 

submitted by,

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS
DOVER, DE
rockym@erols.com


MAKING YOUR OWN COSTUMES

GRADES: 3-8

MATERIALS:

  • pattern of body shape
  • scissors
  • Art Tape, 9" x 12"
  • colored construction paper
  • glue

METHOD:

  1. I had students work in groups of three. I gave each student a body pattern to trace around and then had the students create a costume for their person.
  2. One student was responsible for the mask, one was responsible for the shirt or cape and one was responsible for the pants and shoes.
  3. Using Art Tape, the students cut or tore out their costumes and licked and stuck them to their person to create the costume.
  4. Then they glued their person to a colored piece of paper to complete the project.
 

submitted by

JUDITH WALSH
no school listed
no city listed
JWalsh4000@aol.com


IMPROVISATIONS: GENERAL GUIDELINES AND SOME HALLOWEEN IDEAS

GRADES: 5-12

MATERIALS:

  • none

METHOD:

  1. Guidelines for Improvisation: When an improvisation involves working with another person or a group, all the participants need to follow the same guidelines. When the numbered guidelines are used, the improvisation will seem as if it were planned and rehearsed.
  2. Before you begin the scene, decide who you are, what you want, and what your relationship is to the other characters. You should draw on your memory of real-life characters and imitate them.
  3. Once you have established a character in your mind, you need to communicate that character to your audience through your dialogue and actions.
  4. Try hard to remain the same person during the improvisation. Stay in character. "Breaking character" occurs when you say or do something that is inconsistent with the role you are creating.
  5. Begin your dialogue with enthusiasm and confidence.
  6. It doesn't really matter who talks first. In scenes with just two characters, you will find it easy to take turns speaking. In larger groups, there will not be a set pattern for the conversation. All of the actors should try hard to participate in the dialogue.
  7. It is very important in improvisation to pay attention, listening carefully to what is being said and following what is happening in the scene. Then you can respond appropriately. To keep the conversation flowing, concentrate on what is being said, not on yourself. When you really listen to what is being said, you will be surprised how easy it is to think of something to say in response.
  8. Avoid "dead-end" words or phrases. Responses such as "No," "Okay," "So?" and "Well?" stop the dialogue. These phrases make it difficult for the other players in the scene to continue the conversation or action. And disagreeing with what your partner has said with negative responses such as "That's not right," or "No, she's not" makes it difficult to do much more than argue. Another roadblock is to not respond when your partner makes a statement or asks a question. When a member of the improvisation replies with a response such as "Oh?" "Really?" or "What?" build on it and continue the dialogue.
  9. Avoid questions that can be answered by "yes" or "no." If you must ask questions, it is much better to ask open-ended questions. A question such as "Why did you come home so late?" would give the other players an easy opening into the conversation.
  10. Always look for a way to end the scene. When the natural ending occurs, conclude the scene. Remember, your group is working as an ensemble, so the ending might not be your idea. Part of the fun is finding out what happens to end the scene.

Halloween Improv Ideas

You accept a dare to spend the night in a haunted house.
You are two elderly ghosts assigned to haunt your school.
After trick-or-treating, you discover you can't get your masks off.
You get caught wrapping a house by your school principal--it's his house.
You are two bats who have no sense of radar and are hopelessly lost.
You are two southern ghosts lost in New York.
You're a vampire trying to make a withdrawal at the blood bank.
You are the two Adams children all grown up now.
You are two beauty queens trying out for "Miss Halloween".
While babysitting for your new neighbors, you hear chains rattling and footsteps in their attic.
A UFO lands in your lawn at midnight on Oct. 30th--Halloween eve.
You are asked to take your little sister trick-or-treating.
You come home from trick-or treating and find out that your family has turned into zombies.
While sorting through your Halloween candy, one of your Hershey bars begins to talk to you.
You are two elderly men bobbing for apples at a Halloween party.
You go to a seance and contact the spirit of Elvis.
You go to a horror movie and find out that the Invisible Man is sitting next to you.
While on a date with the best looking girl in school, you find yourself turning into the wolfman.
You are carving a jack-o-lantern when it starts to talk to you.
You are trying on a witches costume when you actually become a witch.
At midnight on Halloween, your mother turns into Madonna and your dad turns into Frankenstein.
You are two kids about to go trick-or-treating for the first time.
You are watching a scary movie on Halloween and you hear a noise outside.
You go to a Halloween party and find you're the only two that dressed up in costume.
Your boyfriend comes to your house for Halloween dressed as Barney.
Your mother insists you go to the school Halloween dance as Forrest Gump.
You and your friend are in the pumpkin patch waiting for the Great Pumpkin to appear.
You are two kids who get your candy stolen by Batman and Robin.
Everybody thinks your nerd costume is great at school, but you didn't dress up.
You and your friend are so excited about Halloween that you get dressed in costume and hurry to school--only to find out you are one day early.

 

submitted by

DONNA LAMPMAN
ZACHRY MIDDLE SCHOOL
SAN ANTONIO, TX
dlampman@tenet.edu


HALLOWEEN SONGS THAT ANYONE CAN USE!

GRADES: 2-8

Great Pumpkin is Coming to Town (to the tune of "Santa Clause is Coming to Town")

Oh you better not shriek
You better not groan
you better not howl
you better not moan
Great Pumpkin is coming to town
He's going to find out
from folks that he meets
who deserves tricks
and who deserves treats
Great Pumpkin is coming to town
He'll reach every pumpkin patch
Haunted houses far and near
to see if you've been spreading gloom
or bringing lots of cheer
so
you better not shriek
you better not groan
you better not howl
you better not moan
Great Pumpkin is coming to town

Pumpkin Bells (to the tune of Jingle Bells)

Dashing through the streets
in our costumes bright and gay
to each house we go
laughing all the way
Halloween is here making lots of cheer
oh what fun to trick or treat
when Halloween is here
Pumpkin bells, pumpkin bells
ringing loud and clear
oh what fun Great Pumpkin brings
When Halloween is here!


SCARECROW

GRADES: 3-7

MATERIALS:

  • Scissors
  • Glue
  • 9x12 construction paper:  blue, yellow, red, green, white, brown and orange.
  • Patterns will also work on 12x18 constructions paper if they are enlarged to 141%

METHOD:

  1. Run patterns on card stock.
  2. Cut Give each group of 4 to 6 children a set of patterns to share.
  3. Have the children then trace the patterns on to construction paper and cut them out.
  1. -OR-

  2. On the pages marked class pages run enough patterns for the entire class on the construction paper.
  3. The teacher will then need to cut the patterns a part.
  4. Then pass the pattern pieces out to the children for them to finish cutting and complete the project.

PROCEDURES FOR ASSEMBLING THE PROJECT:

  1. Glue two brown strips of construction on black construction paper to form platform for scarecrow.
  2. Cut 1 to 11/2 inch fringe on yellow straw hands and feet. Glue yellow straw hands and feet on reverse side of orange shirt and blue pants of scarecrow.
  3. Cut fringe into half circle yellow hair pattern to make it look like straw hair and then glue on to top of post.  Turn blue pants over and glue on to brown post near bottom of black paper.
  4. Turn orange shirt over and glue on to brown post and to blue pants.
  5. Glue white collar on to orange shirt and yellow head on top of white collar.  Glue green pocket on to orange shirt and green and red patches on to blue pants.  Draw face (see pattern sheet) on to yellow circle.
  6. Glue brown hat on to yellow head and black paper. 
 

Submitted by,

DIANNE TANSEY
no school listed
no city listed
LakeshoreVenture@aol.com


MODERN PICTURE ABOUT ME

GRADES: 6-12

This is always one of my students' favorite projects. I have used it in 6th-12th grade Art and it works well in each level.

MATERIALS:

  • 12X18 sheet of white drawing paper
  • pencil
  • marker (any color, but each student only needs one color)
  • ruler
  • stencils or cutouts of symbols for various things (optional-you can make them draw everything themselves, but I find it easier to provide them some cut outs to use)

METHOD:

  1. Think of 10 symbols that could be used to represent YOU (baseball, music, telephone, reading, car, etc.)
  2. Draw the ten symbols on your paper covering as much of the paper as possible.
  3. Use a ruler to draw horizontal and vertical lines every two inches on top of your drawing to make a checker board.
  4. With the marker, fill in every other space alternating shape, background, shape, background and so on. Switch at the beginning of each row. i.e. checkerboard-like
  5. Remember, you need to plan and think ahead. Mistakes in coloring are very difficult to fix.
 

submitted by

LESLEY BATTLES
DOGAN MIDDLE SCHOOL
TYLER, TX
kbat@gower.net


INTRODUCTION TO THEATER ARTS

GRADES: 4-12

MATERIALS:

  • none

METHOD:

  1. Choose one, or the combination of both of the following ideas, and together with a partner (Duet) create a way to introduce yourselves to the audience. Your skit must be based off of the show(s) and bring out several items about yourselves. AMERICA'S MOST WANTED &/or LIFE STYLES OF THE RICH AND FAMOUS
  2. You must bring out your real name so everyone knows who you are. Other areas you may choose information from to bring out within the skit are:
    • Place of Birth
    • Family Members ( Sisters/ Brothers/Pets etc.)
    • Hobbies
    • Talents
    • Favorite Things
    • Things you dislike
    • Places you've been
    • Places you'd like to go
    • Most embarrassing moment, etc.
  3. Example: One Student stands off to the side with his head in a frame. The other student sits on a set and pretends to be the host of the show America's Most Wanted In School. He begins to talk about this student who is wanted for various crimes. He's a happy and friendly chap that loves to help teachers. He enjoys participating in the Science Club, Student Council and he also is a member of the Wolverine Band. (Give a physical description), and tell other things about him etc. Finish by saying:"If you should see him, stop him and introduce yourself. He's a great person to know. This has been your host ( and give your real name) of America's Most Wanted In School. Tune in next time for another wanted student.
  4. Example: Life Styles of the Rich and Famous. Two students pretend to be rich and famous. One is going to be interviewed by Barbara Walters and is very nervous as this is the first time she has been interviewed on live TV. She goes over to the other student (famous person's) house to get support. They do a practice run of questions that might be asked, actually bringing the information out about each other.
  5. Information should be true, not made up. Time element: 3-5 minutes Props: optional Costumes: optional
 

submitted by

DONNA LAMPMAN
H.B. ZACHRY MIDDLE SCHOOL
SAN ANTONIO, TX
dlampman@tenet.edu


MUSICAL INTRODUCTIONS

GRADES: K-3

Use a familiar tune to introduce yourself to students, and learn about introductions, (shaking hands)

MATERIALS:

  • words to song
  • classroom rhythm instruments (opt)

METHOD:

  1. Teach song: What is Your Name? to the tune of Frere' Jacques: Teacher/Class: What is your name? What is your Name? Tell us please. Tell us please. We would like to meet you. We would like to meet you. What's your name? What's your name?
  2. Have students listen and repeat lines. Bring up children one by one or in groups. Introduce yourself, shake hands, and then have student say "My name is ______." They can then sit down.
  3. After the children are comfortable with the words, begin adding variations like clapping, snapping, singing entire song, singing without clapping/clapping no singing.
  4. You can also incorporate number patterns into the way you bring students up. 1 - 2 - 3 - 2 -1, adding groups, asking questions for classification (girls/boys), etc.
I have used this successfully in both English and Spanish-language classrooms.
 
submitted by
 
MICHELE SOUTHERLAND
HAYCOX ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
OXNARD, CA
mrsouth@juno.com

BEGINNING OF SCHOOL SILHOUETTE

GRADES: 4-12

MATERIALS:

  • 9 x 14 drawing paper
  • color pencils
  • pencils
  • scissors
  • overhead projector

METHOD:

  1. Tape the drawing paper to the chalkboard and slide a desk almost up to the board under the paper.
  2. Have each student sit on the desk so that when the overhead shines on him/her, it creates a shadow on the paper behind the student. (The student is creating a silhouette.)
  3. Trace, or have another student trace, the outline of the silhouette onto the drawing paper.
  4. The owner of the silhouette takes it to his/her desk and divides the silhouette into sections.
  5. Instruct the students to illustrate each section in a different way that represents him or her. (Encourage students to make large sections.) Include things like hobbies, favorite food, friends, home, etc. Students who run out of ideas can also fill in some of the sections with patterns like stripes or dots.
  6. When the silhouette is completed, cut it out and paste onto a different color of 9 x 14 paper.

I always hang on the wall near the ceiling and students don't get them back until the end of the year. They are a great referral when trying to find that thing that "clicks" with students.

 

submitted by

LEANNA ROSEKRANS
DEWITT PUBLIC SCHOOLS
DEWITT, MI
lrosekrans@voyager.net


PERSONAL HISTORY

GRADES: 1-6

I use this activity for my Personal History at the beginning of the year. It is really interesting to read all the responses.

MATERIALS:

When Jo Louis Won the Title by Belinda Rochelle
  • lined paper
  • white paper with a large oval drawn in the middle
  • art supplies (pencils, markers, crayons, etc.)
  • construction paper (approx. 18" x 12")

METHOD:

  1. Read the story When Jo Louis Won the Title (This is a story of a young girl who learns why her name is so special to her family.)
  2. Ask the students to then go home and research how they got their names and what they mean. Have them write a short report on the lined paper. You could even have them include their personal opinions on their names.
  3. In class, have the students draw a self portrait. Use the paper with oval. It is interesting to see the students' artistic development. Some will use the oval as a frame and others will use the oval as the shape of their heads. This is also a good time to teach some basic drawing techniques.
  4. When both assignments are finished, have the students glue each, side by side, on the construction paper. Post in your room or in the hallway.
submitted by
 
AMY BROOKS
EMERSON SCHOOL
ANN ARBOR, MI
Hbrooks@rc.net

POSTCARDS FROM MY SUMMER VACATION

GRADES: K-6

MATERIALS:

  • index cards (small or large)
  • crayons and pencils

METHOD:

  1. Give each student an index card, crayons and pencils. (just crayons for the k).
  2. Then ask students to think back to a particular part of their summer that they would like to capture on a post card. A part of summer that they really enjoyed and then draw it on the blank side of the index card.
  3. On the lined side of the card, I ask them to write a little something about their picture and then address the card to me. They can even draw a stamp if they like!
I collect the post cards and put them in our showcase end to end, covering the whole showcase. It makes for a very colorful display.
 
submitted by
 
JUDITH WALSH
MT. ZION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
SUFFOLK, VA
JWalsh4000@aol.com

STUDENT GALLERY

GRADES: 3-12

MATERIALS:

  • 9" X 12" white paper
  • crayons or colored pencils (for older students)
  • small hand held mirrors

METHOD:

  1. At the beginning of the year, after I tell my students about the rules and explain contests that I promote during the year, I pass out small hand held mirrors and ask my art students to draw a picture of themselves.
  2. When they are finished, I hang them up across my room and call it the "Student Gallery".
  3. At the end of the year, they draw another picture of themselves and compare it to the one they drew at the beginning of the year! They are pleasantly surprised at the progress they made during the year.
  4. I pass the pictures out and they get to take both of them home at year's end.
 

submitted by

JUDITH WALSH
MT. ZION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
SUFFOLK, VA
JWALSH4000@aol.com


GETTING ACQUAINTED

GRADE LEVEL: 1-7

MATERIALS:

  • red construction paper
  • apple template
  • scissors, crayons
  • magazine/newspapers
  • white ink (optional)
  • current photo of each student (take photos first week(s) of school)

METHOD:

  1. Trace/cut apple template onto red paper
  2. Write name at top of apple
  3. Glue/tape photo to center of apple
  4. Choose words that describe student from newspapers/magazines (caring, kind, creative, sports, reader, and so on)
  5. Cut out words and glue around photo
  6. Place on BB or outside wall

EXTENSION:

  • Use yellow, green paper to depict various colors of apples
  • Teacher creates a getting acquainted apple
  • Make a flip-up apple;place photo on outside flap; glue words on inside flap
  • Students can stick fuzzy/glittery apple stickers around the inside/outside of the apple
 

submitted by

VALERIE CALLUCCI
no school listed
DAVENPORT, NY
vcallucci@juno.com

 

 

 

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